Details

The effects of self-monitoring psychological states on behavioral weight management treatment

by Jefferson, Monica L.

Abstract (Summary)
One of the most widely available and appropriate treatments for overweight and moderately obese individuals is the behavioral treatment of these conditions. While behavioral weight loss treatments have been shown to lead to clinically significant improvements in health, research suggests that participants in behavioral weight loss treatments experience significant symptoms of psychological distress and that this distress can adversely affect treatment outcomes. Given the significant role that psychological factors play in limiting participant success with behavioral weight loss treatment, the current study implemented a psychological intervention expected to promote more favorable treatment outcomes. The present study investigates the effects of self-monitoring psychological states on behavioral weight management treatment outcomes. Fifty-six participants enrolled in The Ohio State University Comprehensive Weight Management Program (CWMP) were randomly assigned to a self-monitoring condition or a usual care control condition. Self-monitoring participants were instructed to monitor seven psychological states, daily, for twelve consecutive weeks. During the first four weeks, self-monitoring participants were also instructed to engage in a phone-based feedback session with a researcher. Class attendance, body mass index (BMI), and various measures of psychological well-being and impact of weight on quality of life were assessed at baseline, post-intervention (6 weeks), and follow-up (12 weeks). Results revealed no differences between participants assigned to the self-monitoring condition and control condition with regard to class attendance and BMI at baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up. Overall, results revealed no effects of group x time or group assignment on psychological well-being or quality of life. Results generally revealed that participants assigned to the self-monitoring and control groups attended all 6 CWMP classes scheduled to occur by the time of post-intervention assessment and approximately 11 of the 12 CWMP classes scheduled to occur by the time of the follow-up assessment. Results revealed that participants assigned to self-monitoring and control groups experienced significant decreases in BMI across time. Results generally revealed that all participants tended to experience increases in psychological well-being and decreases in the impact of weight on quality of life across time.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:The Ohio State University

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:obesity overweight self monitoring behavioral treatment psychological well being

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2005

© 2009 OpenThesis.org. All Rights Reserved.