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Women and Politics: A Study of Women Trained in a Political Leadership Setting

by Kerle, Maria Battista

Abstract (Summary)
This study described in the narrative how women trained in a political leadership setting can create an environment where women's development is enhanced in terms of a woman's voice, her networking abilities, as well as her expectations of herself and of the program. This is the first study of its kind to study women trained in a political leadership setting. The population of this research study consisted of the Executive Director for the state of Pennsylvania in the Excellence in Public Service Series, the researcher, and the women that were participants in the 2005-2006 class in Pennsylvania. Various methods were used to gather data. The Executive Director was interviewed. The researcher provided the background on the program and her personal experiences as a participant. Finally, the participants of the 2005-2006 class answered an open-ended questionnaire that focused on three main elements: the voice, expectation levels, and networking. An analysis of the research reveals leadership skills of a woman can be enhanced by participating in a leadership training program of "all-woman" where women are exposed through knowledge, experiences, and practice. The building of trusting relationships, the increased knowledge base, and the networking helped the women to have more confidence, the ability to engage in meaningful dialogue, and to envision higher levels of expectations of themselves necessary for professional development than what was previously considered prior to entering the program. Further, for many, the program exceeded their expectations or the program was a valuable learning experience that no woman would want to miss.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Charlene Trovato; Richared Seckinger; Charles Gorman

School:University of Pittsburgh

School Location:USA - Pennsylvania

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:administrative and policy studies

ISBN:

Date of Publication:06/27/2007

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