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UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS AND BEHAVIORS REGARDING SECONDHAND SMOKE, SMOKING BANS, AND SPENDING IN SMOKE-FREE ESTABLISHMENTS

by MOLLOY, BRIGID A

Abstract (Summary)
The present study assessed students’ perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of the effects of secondhand smoke and their willingness to patronize smoke free establishments at one public and one private university in the same Midwest city. A total of 1232 university students enrolled in courses at one public and one private university in the same Midwest city were surveyed regarding their support for smoking bans, preferences regarding smoking policy, and projected relative time and money spent in restaurants and bars/nightclubs if there was a smoking ban in effect (participation rate = 98.%). Results indicated that most university students believed that secondhand smoke is unhealthy and most supported a law banning smoke in restaurants and a law banning smoke in bars/nightclubs. Most students also reported preferring stricter smoking restrictions (M=3.59, SD=.599) compared to their impression of their friends’ preferences (M=3.16, SD=.880). The same was true for their preferences for smoking restrictions in bars/nightclubs (M=3.04, SD=1.018 and M=2.57, SD=1.126). On average, students predicted that their money and time expenditures in restaurants would not change if there were a law banning smoke in restaurants. On average, the same was also true for the university students’ money and time expenditures in bars/nightclubs. T-tests were conducted on twelve hypotheses. Results indicated that smoking status significantly affected support for restaurant smoking bans, bar smoking bans, projected change in money and time expenditures in bars, and projected change in money and time expenditures in restaurants. Restaurant patronage had no significant relationship with students’ support for laws banning smoking in restaurants and students’ projected changes in money and time expenditures in restaurants. However, bar patronage did have a significant relationship with students’ support for laws banning smoking in restaurants, and projected changes in time and money expenditures in bars/nightclubs if there was a law banning smoking in bars/nightclubs.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:smoking bans secondhand smoke free

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2005

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