Details

Supervisory Practices of Three Female Principals in the Era of No Child Left Behind

by Varley, Shannon M

Abstract (Summary)
The purpose of this study was to describe the present status of teacher supervision and evaluation in the era of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) as experienced by three female elementary principals and twelve female elementary teachers in a suburban school district in Western Pennsylvania. The study compared the findings from the literature in the areas of supervision and evaluation, leadership, communication style, power orientation, and ethic of care, with the beliefs and reality of present practice. The literature cited focused on the ways that female principals enact the role of an instructional leader when supervising and evaluating teachers. The study took the form of a case study in order to provide a detailed description of a single school district in Western Pennsylvania. Three elementary schools, each headed by a female principal, were studied in the district. Interview questions were constructed based on the research questions. Each interview was transcribed and content analysis was employed to identify commonalities in the data. Common themes were identified for each research question based on the responses of the principals and teachers. The study revealed profound consistency between the information cited in the literature and the information reported by the three elementary principals and twelve female elementary teachers in the areas of supervision and evaluation, leadership, communication style, power orientation, and ethic of care. The study also revealed the potential conflicts between the beliefs of the principals and the NCLB legislation and the effects of NCLB on the practices of the principals and teachers.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Charles Gorman, Ed. D.; Sue Goodwin, Ed. D.; Sean Hughes; Maureen Porter, Ed. D.

School:University of Pittsburgh

School Location:USA - Pennsylvania

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:administrative and policy studies

ISBN:

Date of Publication:03/29/2005

© 2009 OpenThesis.org. All Rights Reserved.