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A STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSPLANTING VS. SEEDING OF LUPINUS PERENNISIN AN OAK SAVANNA REGENERATION SITE

by St. Mary, Mark K

Abstract (Summary)
Lupinus perennis(Fabaceae) is an indicator species for savanna and barrens habitat throughout the Great Lakes region and northeastern United States. It is also the sole larval food source for the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly ( Lycaeides melissa samuelis) and an important food source for other threatened butterfly species. Although butterfly recovery programs include restoration of existing lupine populations and establishment of new ones, the determination of the optimum conditions and method of lupine repopulation has received little attention. This study compared the survival, growth and reproduction of L. perennisfor two growing seasons after planting. Seed and greenhouse grown transplants from four population sources were planted across naturally occurring gradients of light, soil moisture, pH, phosphorous, and soil surface materials along field transects in a savanna restoration. Estimates of labor required in the production, planting and aftercare of both greenhouse plants and seeds were also compared. Both population source and substrate type significantly influenced seedling emergence, while survival decreased with increased light levels, herbivory, and disturbance. As expected, transplants had significantly greater survival than seedlings, but were also affected by initial size, population source, herbivory and disturbance. Seedling size was influenced by population source, light, and soil pH, while transplant size varied only with population and light. Only 1% of seedlings flowered in the second season, compared to 25% of transplants. Only population source had a significant effect on seed production by the transplants. Although approximately 9.5 times more labor was required for transplants, they outperformed the seedlings in survival, size and potential fecundity in the first two seasons. Optimal planting locations and the relative merits of establishing populations of L. perennis within butterfly habitat regeneration projects are discussed.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:Bowling Green State University

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:lupinus perennis savanna restoration seeding transplants lycaeides melissa samuelis butterfly habitat

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2007

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