Details

Radio Frequency Low Noise and High Q Integrated Filters in Digital CMOS Processes

by Xiong, Zhijie

Abstract (Summary)
Radio Frequency Low Noise and High Q Integrated Filters in Digital CMOS Processes Zhijie Xiong 149 pages Directed by Dr. Phillip E. Allen Presented in this work is a novel design technique for CMOS integration of RF high Q integrated filters using positive feedback and current mode approach. Two circuits are designed in this work: a 100MHz low-noise and high Q bandpass filter suited for an FM radio front-end, and a 2.4GHz low-noise and high-Q bandpass filter suited for a Bluetooth front-end. Current-mode approach and positive feedback design techniques are successfully used in the design of both circuits. Both circuits are fabricated through a 0.18um CMOS process provided by National Semiconductor Corp. The 100MHz circuit achieves 3.15uV RF sensitivity with 26dB SNR, and the total current consumption is 12mA. The center frequency of the filter is tunable from 80MHz to 110MHz, and the Q value is tunable from 0.5 to 28.9. 1 dB compression point is measured as -34.0dBm, combined with noise measurement results, a dynamic range of 54.1 dB results. Silicon area of the core circuit is 0.4 square millimeters. The center frequency of the 2.4GHz circuit is tunable from 2.4GHz to 2.5GHz, and the Q value is tunable from 20 to 120. The 1 dB compression dynamic range of the circuit is 50dB. Integrated spiral inductors are developed for this design. Patterned ground shields are laid out to reduce inductor loss through substrate, especially eddy current loss when the circuit is fabricated on epi wafers. Accumulation mode MOS varactors are designed to tune the frequency response. Silicon area of the core circuit is 1 square millimeter.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Morley, Tom; Laskar, Joy; Leach, Marshall; Allen, Phillip; Hertling, Dave

School:Georgia Institute of Technology

School Location:USA - Georgia

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:engineering

ISBN:

Date of Publication:07/09/2004

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