Details

RACE, HYPERSEGREGATED COMMUNITIES AND NEGATIVE HEALTH OUTCOMES: ASSESSING THE RISK OF HYPERTENSION AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS IN METROPOLITAN AREAS

by Jones, Antwan

Abstract (Summary)
Using data from the 2005 BRFSS and 2005 ACS, this study analyzes the impact of race on the likelihood of developing hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD). The focus on race is relevant: African-Americans are more likely to die with CHD than Whites, even though African-Americans are less likely to be diagnosed with CHD. To date, there is no empirical explanation on why this racial disparity exists. However, there are emerging biosocial and community context explanations that help situate why the racial disparity persists. Multivariate results indicate that race is and remains a significant predictor of both hypertension and CHD after controlling for demographic factors. Living in a segregated, hypersegregated or extremely hypersegregated community is also associated with increased odds of developing hypertension and CHD. These and other results document that community socioeconomic status may be more important for better health than individual SES. Policy implications are then discussed.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:Bowling Green State University

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:african americans chd coronary heart disease health hypersegregation hypertension morbidity race segregation

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2007

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