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Policy analysis: The restructuring of the delivery of vocational education in the North Shore area of Massachusetts

by Carlson, Patricia W

Abstract (Summary)
This study assessed the political acceptability and efficacy of a theoretical policy for the restructuring of the delivery of vocational education in the North Shore area of Massachusetts. The theoretical policy, proposed by the author, was analyzed and assessed employing Wergin's (1976) Open Systems Model. The researcher found Wergin's (1976) Model to be particularly useful in assessing the political issues surrounding policy formation. Data for the study were collected from a survey of documents generating from the North Shore Regional Vocational School District, such as minutes of meetings and various reports conducted for the District over the period of its existence, from accounts in the print media about the District, from the proceedings of meetings and presentations involving community and school officials throughout the District, and from the personal knowledge and observations of the researcher from her many years of contact with the District. The results indicate that the theoretical policy, when analyzed, using Wergin's (1976) major proposition and corollary propositions, in light of identified organizational constraints, problem and positive elements, has a low predictability of acceptance, and must be modified by developing strategies to accommodate the value conflicts which exist between and among organizations which were part of this study. It was concluded that a policy which has a high predictability of political acceptance and efficacy can be formulated, and that implementation of such a policy is anticipated to provide a vehicle for the restructuring of the delivery of vocational education in the North Shore area of Massachusetts.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Massachusetts Amherst

School Location:USA - Massachusetts

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/1990

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