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THE INFLUENCE OF FITNESS AND EXERCISE STATUS ON MOOD CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH 10 AND 30 MINUTES OF CYCLING

by Nicole, Serene Marie

Abstract (Summary)
Acute exercise is associated with psychological benefits, but personal characteristics and training factors may influence this relationship. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of fitness and exercise status on psychological changes associated with 10 and 30 minutes of cycling. A secondary purpose was to determine if enjoyment of cycling or exercise influences psychological changes associated with 10 and 30 minutes of cycling. The independent variables were fitness, exercise status, cycling enjoyment, exercise enjoyment, and duration. Participants included 26 non-exercisers (n = 18 men, n = 8 women) and 21 exercisers (n = 10 men, n = 11 women); mean age = 21.66 ± 1.03. More desirable scores for all measures of mood and affect (except fatigue) were reported following exercise. Low fit individuals, non-exercisers, and the low exercise enjoyment group reported an increase in fatigue immediately following exercise whereas exercisers reported lower fatigue following exercise. Exercisers reported an increase in vigor immediately following exercise whereas non-exercisers’ scores remained the same. The low cycling enjoyment group reported a decrease in total mood disturbance following the 10 minute duration, while individuals in the high cycling group reported little change in scores. Individuals in the low cycling enjoyment group reported a decrease in total mood disturbance immediately following the 30 minute duration, while individuals in the high cycling enjoyment group reported a decrease in total mood disturbance after the 30 minute duration that persisted 20 minutes post exercise. The high cycling enjoyment group reported similar enjoyment scores for both durations, and the low cycling enjoyment group reported higher enjoyment scores after the 30 minute compared to the 10 minute duration. It is concluded that 10 and 30 minutes of cycling improves mood, and personal characteristics (i.e., fitness level, exercise status) seem to moderate primarily somatic-related mood states. Exercise specific enjoyment may also moderate mood and enjoyment associated with exercise.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:Bowling Green State University

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

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ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2006

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