Details

A Geospatial Analysis of Wind Energy Development and Authorization Policy on US Forest Service Land

by Schlichting, Kerry

Abstract (Summary)
Abstract: Wind is a renewable source of energy but its development has the potential for significant negative visual, economic and environmental impacts if not sited carefully. Analysis of a wide range of variables associated with wind development need to be included in policy development to ensure simultaneous conservation and support of renewable energy development. The objective of this project is to analyze wind energy development to inform US Forest Service management practices through applicable federal, agency, forest and state regulations as well as mitigation of potential impacts. Geospatial analysis is used to evaluate project suitability and associated impacts through a case study of the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests in North Carolina. This case study is the basis for a spatial decision support system (sDSS) which offers a methodology to consolidate the assessment and authorization process for wind projects on public lands. Based on 16 variables of representing environmental sensitivities, construction requirements, land designations and state policy, this analysis finds that the majority of the study is are highly sensitive or exclusionary to wind energy development. To both promote renewable energy and continued conservation of environmental resources, the Forest Service must take steps to address concerns raised over management practices limiting development potential. Recommendations from this analysis include the need for agency wide clarification of intent and scope of current and proposed Forest Service wind energy management, as well as the prioritization of variable importance in future wind project siting.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Mercer, Evan

School:Duke University

School Location:USA - North Carolina

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:wind power us forest service gis renewable energy policy

ISBN:

Date of Publication:04/24/2009

© 2009 OpenThesis.org. All Rights Reserved.