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A GENERALIZED EXTENDED SUZUKI MODEL FOR LAND MOBILE SATELLITE CHANNELS

by BHORGAY, KETAKI D

Abstract (Summary)
Wireless communication technology has grown significantly over the past decade. A steady increase in the number of users necessitates assurance of good quality of the overall communication. To successfully receive a signal at the mobile receiver, it is necessary that the received signal should be above a certain threshold signal strength. This depends on numerous factors including the geography of the area. It is not feasible to always perform field tests for every parameter change in a wireless communication system. Hence, most often, researchers rely on channel simulators to test the quality of signal. These channel simulators are therefore a very important part of mobile communication, system design and testing, and there is a growing need to make them as close to `real-world conditions' as possible. In this thesis we make an effort to introduce a channel fading simulator that is based on a theoretical model proposed previously. We extend the previous work by performing second order statistics and phase statistic analysis for the proposed theoretical model, which is called the Generalized Extended Suzuki Model (GESM) in this thesis. We present a deterministic simulator and do mathematical analysis of this simulator for its statistical properties. We compare the performance of the simulator with the theory and present the results. This simulator takes into account two types of fading: multipath fading and shadow fading. This simulator is good for land mobile terrestrial, as well as land mobile satellite types of mobile communication systems. Due to the greater flexibility of this simulator, we believe that this model can be very helpful for system tests.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:wireless communication channel fading sum of sinusoid simulator

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2005

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