Details

FROM THE GROUND UP: SITE-SPECIFIC ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN FROM ANALYSIS OF THE NATURAL AND MAN-MADE

by LANDON, BEATRICE

Abstract (Summary)
Architecture is not just the design of buildings; it is also the creation of an experience that comes from an interrelation between the site and the building. Architecture that comes from the study of the land, culture, and history of individual sites is site-specific and achieves this interrelation and unification. The Modern Movement removed site-specificity from design; it theorized and practiced architecture as an object or autonomous form, as ‘universal’ – with the consequent loss of cultural identity – often with poor site selection and poor locating of buildings for specific program needs. Site-specific architecture, responding to locales, communities, and cultural identity, was the historical norm in vernacular architecture. More recently, it has been the basis of Critical Regionalism. The creation of site-specific architecture includes a thorough site analysis that is applied consistently to every project. This site analysis is a systematic approach to studying the land, elements that affect the land, and social and cultural aspects that influence the natural and artificial landscapes. It begins with collecting and analyzing an information inventory of the site. Successful site-specific architecture comes from a process that emphasizes a thorough, consistent use of the site analysis that is then used to make design decisions. The outcome of the present research and design exercise is the creation of environmentally sensitive and appropriate architecture for a College of Earth Sciences on the University of Cincinnati campus.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2004

© 2009 OpenThesis.org. All Rights Reserved.