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FACTORS AFFECTING STD VACCINE ACCEPTANCE IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

by BOEHNER, CONSTANCE WILLIAMS

Abstract (Summary)
Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) continue to be a critical public health issue; the disease burden is immense; treating STDs and their sequelae costs billions per year. Currently, there are several vaccines in development for use against STDs that may potentially control recurrent infections, thus reducing the chance for transmission. There may be unique barriers associated with acceptance of vaccines for human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). Poor acceptance will lead to limited impact on the sexually transmitted disease epidemic. College students completed questionnaires in which the HSV (n = 259) or HPV (n = 256) vaccine acceptance was examined in terms of one of three presentations. The presentations were based on sequelae of STD acquisition: reproductive sequelae, sexually related sequelae, or a combination of both. Overall acceptance (74%) was not different between HSV and HPV, or between the three presentations of the vaccine. The following were associated with HSV vaccine acceptance: belief that parents would recommend it, belief in universal herpes vaccination strategy, belief (or actually being) at risk, and age, with younger students more likely to accept, likelihood ratio, chi square = (27, N = 227)= 135.2, p = .0001. The following were associated with HPV vaccine acceptance: low cost and endorsement of universal HPV vaccination, likelihood ratio,(14, N = 214) = 104.24, p = .0001. Most college students would take an HSV or HPV vaccine regardless of whether reproductive or sexual issues were highlighted. Providers need not avoid discussing the sexual transmission of these viruses with young adults when offering vaccines. Models predicting vaccine acceptance for HSV and HPV are different, suggesting that strategies to foster acceptance may need to be pathogen-specific.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:sexually transmitted diseases vaccines vaccine acceptance

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2002

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