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Effects of Different Types of Drinking and Driving PSAs on Persons with Varying Levels of Drinking and Driving Experience

by Santa, Annesa Flentje

Abstract (Summary)
Santa, Annesa Flentje, M.A., Autumn 2006 Psychology Effects of Different Types of Drinking and Driving PSAs on Persons with Varying Levels of Drinking and Driving Experience Chairperson: Bryan N. Cochran The potential effectiveness of different types of anti-driving under the influence (DUI) Public Service Announcements (PSAs) was examined in both a college sample and a clinical sample mandated to treatment following a DUI offense. The empathy, fear, and informational PSA approaches were examined. The empathy approach and fear approach were found to be different on both perceived effectiveness and affective responses as measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). Less experience with DUI, lower sensation seeking as measured by the Sensation Seeking Scale V (Zuckerman, 1994), stage of change as measured by an adapted University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale (McConnaughy, Prochaska, & Velicer, 1983), and higher perception of dangerousness of DUI were examined as predictors of perceived effectiveness of anti-DUI PSAs, with all of these variables emerging as good predictors of higher perceived effectiveness. Gender differences in perceived effectiveness were examined for fear and empathy PSAs, with inconclusive findings. Differences in perceived effectiveness were also examined based on level of fearfulness as measured by the Fear Survey Schedule-III (Wolpe & Lang, 1964), with higher fearfulness emerging as a predictor of higher effectiveness ratings for fear PSAs. This study has implications for future PSA research as well practical implications in guiding future PSA development.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Bryan N. Cochran; Dr. David Schuldberg; Gregory Larson

School:The University of Montana

School Location:USA - Montana

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:psychology

ISBN:

Date of Publication:03/16/2007

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