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Effectiveness of the Second Step Violence Prevention Program

by 1958- Carter, Rita Faye

Abstract (Summary)
The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Second Step Violence Prevention Program in reducing office referrals, reducing out of school suspensions, reducing teacher absences, and improving student attendance at a small urban elementary school in North Georgia. The need to evaluate the effectiveness of the program came as a result of the school being placed on the Title I Needs Improvement list. Data were collected from school improvement plans for the year before and the year of the implementation of the Second Step Violence Prevention Program. Analyses of the data for office referrals, out of school suspensions, teacher absences, and student attendance were accomplished by the test of proportionality. Findings indicated that there was a statistically significant decrease in the proportion of office referrals, out of school suspensions, and teacher absences after implementation of the Second Step Violence Prevention Program. Student attendance percentages showed a statistically significant increase over the two years. The Second Step Violence Prevention Program was found to improve school climate as measured by teacher and student attendance, out of school suspensions, and referrals to the school office. Further study is suggested at early childhood and upper elementary levels within schools as well as at schools that implement the program in the middle grades.
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School:The University of Georgia

School Location:USA - Georgia

Source Type:Master's Thesis

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