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DIVIDED ATTENTION DURING ADAPTATION TO VISUAL-MOTOR ROTATION IN AN ENDOSCOPIC SURGERY SIMULATOR

by TOLLNER, ALISON MARIE

Abstract (Summary)
The goal of this research was to understand how cognitive demand affects the process of acquiring adaptive hand-eye coordination. Endoscopic surgery, during which surgeons operate using video cameras and long, thin surgical tools, is an example of a situation that requires adaptive hand-eye coordination. In endoscopic surgery the normal mapping between the hands and the eyes is distorted, presenting a perceptual-motor challenge for surgeons and potentially causing a disruption in coordination. Besides having to adapt to altered perceptual-motor conditions surgeons also have to deal with many other simultaneous demands, such as monitoring vital signs. Having to perform other simultaneous tasks during endoscopic surgery may divert attention that is necessary for the complex movements demanded by the surgery. The specific aim of this study was to investigate whether adaptive performance in an endoscopic surgery simulator suffers under dual-task conditions. I investigated the effects of a concurrent short-term memory (STM) task on adaptation to visual-motor distortions encountered in an endoscopic simulator. Participants completed a peg transfer task in a low-fidelity endoscopic surgery simulator. In the pre-exposure and post-exposure phases participants moved small foam stars between pegs with endoscopic forceps while directly viewing the pegboard. In the exposure phase participants completed the peg transfer task while indirectly viewing the pegboard through a camera and monitor with a 90° clockwise visual rotation of the pegboard. A control group completed the experiment as described whereas an experimental group performed the STM task (mentally rehearsing a random string of digits) during the exposure phase. Performance was significantly disrupted under altered perceptual-motor conditions during early exposure-phase performance. The STM task caused an additional initial performance decrement, but experimental group performance quickly converged on control group performance. The results provide greater support for the single than the multiple resource model of attention.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:divided attention perceptual motor adaptation endoscopic surgery

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2003

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