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A DIETARY INTERVENTION FOCUSING ON VEGETABLE INTAKE IN POST-PARTUM MOTHERS WITH CONCOMITANT EFFECTS ON INFANT VEGETABLE INTAKE

by SMITH, SUZANNE LYNELLE

Abstract (Summary)
Background: Over the last three decades, childhood obesity has been increasing at alarming rates. Because vegetables are low in calories and high in fiber, adequate consumption could help children avoid excessive weight gain. This study explored whether increased consumption of vegetables by lactating mothers will increase their infants’ acceptance of the vegetables. It was hypothesized that infants exposed to vegetable flavors in breast milk will be more likely to accept those vegetables when solid foods are first introduced. Methods: Post-partum mothers (N= 37) were recruited to participate in a nutrition intervention focusing on increasing vegetable intake for weight management. A dietitian provided a face-to-face counseling session, two follow-up motivational interviews by phone, and three pamphlets mailed to their homes. It was expected that both breast feeding and formula feeding women would consume more vegetables. We also expected that the women who were breast-feeding would produce milk containing the flavors of the vegetables and that these flavors would be perceptible to their nursing infants. Results: Both breast and formula feeding mothers increased their vegetable consumption beyond baseline consumption: 2.1 servings per day for the breast feeding group and 1.9 servings per day for the formula feeding group. There were no differences between breast-fed infants and formula fed infants acceptance of vegetables. Conclusion: A behavior-theory based nutrition intervention is effective to increase vegetable consumption in post-partum women.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:University of Cincinnati

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

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ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2006

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