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Development of the seasonal beliefs questionnaire : a measure of cognitions specific to seasonal affective disorder /

by Lippy, Robert D.

Abstract (Summary)
Title of Thesis: Development of the Seasonal Beliefs Questionnaire: A Measure of Robert D. Lippy, Master of Science, 2005 Cognitions Specific to Seasonal Affective Disorder Thesis directed by: Kelly J. Rohan, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology Rohan’s (2002) integrative, cognitive-behavioral model proposes that individuals with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) experience frequent thoughts related to light availability and the seasons. To-date, no measure exists to determine the existence and extent of these hypothesized SAD-specific cognitions. This study developed a preliminary 94-item self-report measure, the Seasonal Beliefs Questionnaire (SBQ), which was administered with several depression, seasonality, and cognitive measures via a secure website to 104 college students from two universities. Volunteers returned approximately 2 weeks later and completed the SBQ again. The SBQ demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .98), high test-retest reliability (r = .93), good convergent validity with other cognitive measures for SAD (rs = .57 - .84) and good divergent validity (r = .27). Based on these promising preliminary psychometrics, continued validation of the SBQ is warranted. Future studies with larger samples will reduce the number of items and perform a confirmatory factor analysis. iii
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School:Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

School Location:USA - Maryland

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:cognitive symptoms depressive disorder mood seasons light emotions internal external control attitude to health personality inventory assessment psychometrics psychiatric status rating scales severity of illness index reproducibility results risk factors seasonal affective questionnaires data collection depression

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