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Chronic Inflammation-Driven Tumor Promotion Asociated with CD8+ T Cells

by Ng, Bernice Yu

Abstract (Summary)
Chronic inflammation is associated with carcinoma development in several clinical settings, and we sought to investigate the role of T cells in this phenomenon using the DMBA/TPA two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. We demonstrate that, paradoxical to models of immunosurveillance, wild-type (WT) mice have a markedly higher rate of tumor formation relative to strains lacking CD8+ T cells. Adoptive transfers of antibody-coated magnetic bead-enriched peripheral CD8+ T cells into TCRáâ-/- mice confirmed that the increased mean tumor area and progression to carcinoma was attributable to the presence of CD8+ T cells. All analyzed strains of mice in which the CD8 compartment was intact (WT, CD4-/-) showed significant increases in tumor susceptibility. Putative tumor-promoting (T-pro) cells (TCRáâ+CD8+CD44+CD62L- tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, TILs) were directly compared to their phenotypic equivalents in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). In WT and CD4-deficient mice, CD8+ TILs consistently revealed a markedly higher relative expression, by RT-PCR, of IFNã, TNFá and COX-2, and a striking decrease in expression of perforin. Cytokine-bead analysis (CBA) comparison of CD8+ and CD4+ TIL in tumors from WT mice confirmed the increased expression by the CD8+ TIL of IFNã and TNFá. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of increased carcinogenesis attributable to CD8+ TILs, characterized by their high IFNã, TNFá, and COX-2 production and defective perforin production relative to phenotypically equivalent PBLs. These studies may have mechanistic implications for the role of T cells in inflammation-associated carcinogenesis.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Michael Girardi, MD

School:Yale University

School Location:USA - Connecticut

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:oncology dermatology cd8 positive t lymphocytes lymphocyte subsets tumor infiltrating mice skin neoplasms

ISBN:

Date of Publication:04/09/2008

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