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Chemical vapor identification using field-based attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared detection and solid phase microextraction /

by Bryant, Chet Kaiser.

Abstract (Summary)
Title: Chemical Agent Identification Using Field-Based Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Detection and Solid Phase Microextraction Chet Kaiser Bryant, Master of Science in Public Health, 2005 Directed By: Peter T. LaPuma, LtCol, USAF, BSC Assistant Professor, Department of Prev Med and Biometrics Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) technology is used to identify chemicals in a liquid or solid phase but not in a vapor phase. This research identified vapor phase chemicals using a field-portable ATR-FTIR spectrometer combined with a solid phase microextraction (SPME) film. Two nerve agent simulants, diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and three polycarbosiloxane polymers were evaluated using a TravelIRTM ATR-FTIR instrument. A SPME film was adhered to the TravelIRTM sampling interface to extract and concentrate vapors to be identified by the TravelIR TM. The lowest air concentration identified was 50 ppb DIMP and 250 ppb DMMP. A remote sampling technique where SPME films were exposed to vapors and then transferred to the TravelIRTM was only able to identify DMMP down to 10 ppm. This research demonstrates it is feasible to use ATR- FTIR to detect vapor phase chemicals when combined with SPME film concentration techniques. iii
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School:Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

School Location:USA - Maryland

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:organophosphorus compounds chromatography gas mass fragmentography polymers fluorescence chemistry analytical environmental monitoring exposure time factors sensitivity and specificity occupational health disaster planning risk assessment specimen handling terrorism national security chemical warfare agents gases asphyxiating poisonous

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