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BEHAVIORAL, COGNITIVE, AND AFFECTIVE PREDICTORS OF CHILD CONDUCT PROBLEMS IN THE CONTEXT OF PARENT-CHILD INTERACTIONS

by Richerson, Lauren A.

Abstract (Summary)
This study examined multidimensional predictors of child conduct problems in the context of parent-child interactions. Seventy-one children aged eight to twelve participated with their mothers. Mother-child dyads engaged in an experimental clean-up task designed to elicit conduct problems. Hierarchical regression analyses determined the predictive utility of behavioral, cognitive, and affective variables. A regression model that included parent predictors (maternal coercion, perceived power, and anger) and child predictors (perceptions of maternal support, negative attributions for mothers’ behavior, and anger) accounted for 50% of the variance in child noncompliance during the clean-up task. Maternal coercion (negative talk) was the most significant predictor; however, incremental variance accounted for by child variables (particularly child anger) provides evidence for mother-child effects. These data highlight the importance of examining interventions that target relational parent-child variables rather than maternal behaviors alone. Further research is needed to clarify the direction of transmission (unidirectional versus bidirectional) of maladaptive parent-child processes and well as to evaluate the extent to which interactive therapies can ameliorate older children’s conduct problems.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:

School:Ohio University

School Location:USA - Ohio

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:conduct problems attributions perceived power negative affect coercion theory maternal support parent child interactions

ISBN:

Date of Publication:01/01/2007

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