Details

Advanced Modulation Formats for High-Bit-Rate Optical Networks

by Haris, Muhammad

Abstract (Summary)
The objective of the proposed research is to investigate the performance of advanced modulation formats, specifically modified duobinary return-to zero (MD-RZ) modulation scheme and its long-haul repeaterless transmission over standard single mode fiber (SMF). This research also focuses on phase modulation formats like differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK), specifically free spectral range (FSR) optimization and wavelength offset tolerance in direct detection of these phase modulated systems. In this research we present a novel and cost effective technique to generate a modified duobinary return-to-zero (MD-RZ) signal. Next, we attained experimental results for single channel and WDM repeaterless transmission using these MD-RZ signals. A numerical comparison is also drawn with other conventional MD-RZ transmitters. MD-RZ transmission characteristics are also studied numerically for 40 Gb/s WDM signals and compared with other two leading constant intensity phase modulated formats like DPSK and DQPSK. We also have presented experimental results for FSR optimization of DQPSK de-modulator for ultra-high data-rate systems in the presence of strong optical filtering. Choice of an optimal FSR beyond 1-bit delay in Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer (MZ-DI) helps relieving some of the degradations due to strong optical filtering. Wavelength offset tolerance is also experimentally measured and numerically investigated for DPSK and DQPSK modulation formats with different transmitter schemes employing intensity or phase modulators to achieve required phase shifts.
Bibliographical Information:

Advisor:Xu, Jun; Chang, Gee-Kung; Yu, Jianjun; Ji, Chunayi; Altunbasak, Yucel; Ralph, Stephen

School:Georgia Institute of Technology

School Location:USA - Georgia

Source Type:Master's Thesis

Keywords:electrical and computer engineering

ISBN:

Date of Publication:05/07/2008

© 2009 OpenThesis.org. All Rights Reserved.